Pediatric Dermatologists Capitol Heights MD

What is the youngest age to get melanoma in Capitol Heights, MD?

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, melanoma is the second most common type of cancer diagnosed in 15-to-19-year-olds, and the most common form of cancer affecting young adults between the ages of 25 and 29. Many of these diagnoses are made in female patients, but young men can develop melanoma as well.

What is the difference between a dermatologist and a pediatric dermatologist in Capitol Heights, MD?

Children have special needs when it comes to skin conditions. That’s why pediatric dermatologists have expertise in how certain skin conditions uniquely affect infants and children, and which treatments are safe and effective.

What does a benign nevus look like in Capitol Heights, MD?

Common nevi are harmless collections of colored cells. They typically appear as small brown, tan, or pink spots. You can be born with moles or develop them later.

At what age should you get a skin exam in Capitol Heights, MD?

Start screening early Several medical organizations recommend having your first skin cancer screening at the age of 20 or older. Then you should have yearly professional exams and perform monthly self-skin exams.

When should I worry about my child’s eczema in Capitol Heights, MD?

Appearance of yellow crust on the eczema patches. Yellow crust indicates that there may be a bacterial infection. This needs to be checked out immediately by a doctor because if it goes untreated, it will get worse. Your doctor will be able to determine if antibiotics should be prescribed to stop the infection.

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Can a doctor tell if a mole is cancerous just by looking at it in Capitol Heights, MD?

A visual check of your skin only finds moles that may be cancer. It can’t tell you for sure that you have it. The only way to diagnose the condition is with a test called a biopsy. If your doctor thinks a mole is a problem, they will give you a shot of numbing medicine, then scrape off as much of the mole as possible.

What does dermatitis look like in children in Capitol Heights, MD?

Children with eczema develop red, dry, itchy patches on the skin that result from inflammation. Itching may be severe and constant. With frequent scratching, the skin may develop blisters, oozing, crusting, or sores from infection.

What should kids with eczema avoid in Capitol Heights, MD?

Dairy. Fish and shellfish. Soy products. Eggs. Tree nuts. Wheat or gluten. Peanuts.

What should you not do before a dermatologist appointment in Capitol Heights, MD?

Go Bare. On the day of your appointment, don’t wear makeup. It’s so much easier for the dermatologist to see what’s going on with your skin.

Do children need skin checks in Capitol Heights, MD?

Children rarely develop skin cancer. Full-body checks are usually not recommended until the early 20’s. Obviously, if there is a concerning lesion that is changing or growing out of proportion to the growth of the child, this needs to be checked by a doctor.

Can a child have a cancerous mole in Capitol Heights, MD?

Some children who have lots of moles get melanoma early in life. An Australian study found that more than half of the 15- to 19-year-old patients with melanoma had at least 100 moles. Bottom line: A child with 50-plus moles should be under a dermatologist’s care. Caught early, melanoma is highly treatable.

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