Skin Cancer Specialists Hot Springs National Park AR

What are the 3 most common skin cancers in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. There are three major types of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

What are the warning signs of basal cell carcinoma in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

A shiny, skin-colored bump that’s translucent, meaning you can see a bit through the surface. A brown, black or blue lesion — or a lesion with dark spots — with a slightly raised, translucent border. A flat, scaly patch with a raised edge. A white, waxy, scar-like lesion without a clearly defined border.

Which cancers are hardest to detect in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Pancreatic cancer doesn’t garner much treatment success for a number of reasons: It’s hard to detect early. The pancreas is deep within the body so there aren’t signs people can detect easily. The disease spreads quickly to other nearby organs, including liver, intestines, and gall bladder.

What does late stage skin cancer look like in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Hard lump on the skin. Hard or swollen lymph nodes. Fatigue. Unexplained pain.

Can you have skin cancer for years and not know in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

For example, certain types of skin cancer can be diagnosed initially just by visual inspection — though a biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. But other cancers can form and grow undetected for 10 years or more , as one study found, making diagnosis and treatment that much more difficult.

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Which skin cancer spreads the fastest in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow fast and to spread quickly to other parts of your body. Treatment options for Merkel cell carcinoma often depend on whether the cancer has spread beyond the skin.

What stage melanoma is terminal in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Stage 4 is the most advanced phase of melanoma, a serious form of skin cancer. This means the cancer has spread from the lymph nodes to other organs, most often the lungs. Some doctors also refer to stage 4 melanoma as advanced melanoma.

What happens if skin biopsy is positive in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Generally, after a patient receives positive melanoma results, his or her doctors will need to proceed with staging the malignancy— which essentially means determining the extent of the cancer—and developing a treatment plan based on how far the cancer has progressed.

What are the red flags for melanoma in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Talk to your doctor if you notice changes in your skin such as a new growth, a sore that doesn’t heal, a change in an old growth, or any of the A-B-C-D-Es of melanoma. A change in your skin is the most common sign of skin cancer. This could be a new growth, a sore that doesn’t heal, or a change in a mole.

What does the first stage of melanoma look like in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the shape, color, size, or feel of an existing mole. However, melanoma may also appear as a new mole. People should tell their doctor if they notice any changes on the skin. The only way to diagnose melanoma is to remove tissue and check it for cancer cells.

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How fast do skin cancers progress in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Some forms of skin cancer tend to grow in a matter of weeks, while others grow over months, or even longer. While a number of factors determine how fast or slow skin cancer may grow in any one individual, some types of skin cancer are more aggressive than others.

Is skin cancer always terminal in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Most skin cancers can be cured if they’re treated before they have a chance to spread. However, more advanced cases of melanoma can be fatal. The earlier skin cancer is found and removed, the better your chances for a full recovery.

Is skin cancer treated by a dermatologist or an oncologist in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Most basal and squamous cell cancers (as well as pre-cancers) are treated by dermatologists – doctors who specialize in treating skin diseases. If the cancer is more advanced, you may be treated by another type of doctor, such as: A surgical oncologist: a doctor who treats cancer with surgery.

What is the hardest skin cancer to treat in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Melanoma is not as common as basal cell or squamous cell carcinomas but is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. If left untreated or caught in a late-stage, melanomas are more likely to spread to organs beyond the skin, making them difficult to treat and potentially life-limiting.

Do you feel unwell with skin cancer in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

General symptoms hard lump on your skin. unexplained pain. feeling very tired or unwell.

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Who is the best doctor for skin cancer in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Dermatologist. A dermatologist is a doctor who’s trained to diagnose and treat conditions that involve the skin, hair, and nails. This type of physician plays an important role in diagnosing skin cancer.

What can be mistaken for melanoma in Hot Springs National Park, AR?

Nevus (mole) Moles, also known as nevi, are one of the most common growths that people find on their skin. Growing mostly in early adulthood these are some of the growths most commonly mistaken for melanomas.