Skin Cancer Specialists Shawnee KS

Do you feel ill with melanoma in Shawnee, KS?

General symptoms hard or swollen lymph nodes. hard lump on your skin. unexplained pain. feeling very tired or unwell.

What are the 4 types of skin cancer in Shawnee, KS?

Basal cell carcinoma. Basal cells are the round cells found in the lower epidermis. Squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the epidermis is made up of flat, scale-like cells called squamous cells. Merkel cell cancer. Melanoma.

Where is the first place skin cancer spreads to in Shawnee, KS?

Doctors have known for decades that melanoma and many other cancer types tend to spread first into nearby lymph nodes before entering the blood and traveling to distant parts of the body.

What cancers are not treatable in Shawnee, KS?

Pancreatic cancer. Mesothelioma. Gallbladder cancer. Esophageal cancer. Liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer. Lung and bronchial cancer. Pleural cancer. Acute monocytic leukemia.

What are the warning signs of basal cell carcinoma in Shawnee, KS?

A shiny, skin-colored bump that’s translucent, meaning you can see a bit through the surface. A brown, black or blue lesion — or a lesion with dark spots — with a slightly raised, translucent border. A flat, scaly patch with a raised edge. A white, waxy, scar-like lesion without a clearly defined border.

Can you have skin cancer for years and not know in Shawnee, KS?

For example, certain types of skin cancer can be diagnosed initially just by visual inspection — though a biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. But other cancers can form and grow undetected for 10 years or more , as one study found, making diagnosis and treatment that much more difficult.

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What does the first stage of melanoma look like in Shawnee, KS?

Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the shape, color, size, or feel of an existing mole. However, melanoma may also appear as a new mole. People should tell their doctor if they notice any changes on the skin. The only way to diagnose melanoma is to remove tissue and check it for cancer cells.

Is skin cancer treated by a dermatologist or an oncologist in Shawnee, KS?

Most basal and squamous cell cancers (as well as pre-cancers) are treated by dermatologists – doctors who specialize in treating skin diseases. If the cancer is more advanced, you may be treated by another type of doctor, such as: A surgical oncologist: a doctor who treats cancer with surgery.

What vitamins fight melanoma in Shawnee, KS?

Some studies report that normal levels of vitamin D 3 at the time of diagnosis are associated with a better prognosis in patients with melanoma. High circulating vitamin D concentration has been found to be associated with reduced melanoma progression and improved survival.

What foods help melanoma in Shawnee, KS?

Antioxidants, such as retinol, are important for a healthy immune system. Studies have found that higher intake of retinol-rich foods, such as fish, milk, eggs, dark green leafy vegetables, and orange/yellow fruits and vegetables led to a 20 percent reduced risk of developing melanoma.

Can you pass away from melanoma in Shawnee, KS?

Melanoma is usually curable when detected and treated early. Once it has spread deeper into the skin or other parts of the body, it becomes more difficult to treat and can be deadly. The estimated five-year survival rate for U.S. patients whose melanoma is detected early is about 99 percent.

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Can you have melanoma for years and not know in Shawnee, KS?

“You could have melanoma for a long time before you realize it, because some types are not so obvious. Some aggressive forms, like nodular melanoma, grow fast, are visible and can hurt or bleed.” While certain groups may be at a higher risk for melanoma, anyone can get the disease.

How long does it take for melanoma to spread in Shawnee, KS?

How fast does melanoma spread and grow to local lymph nodes and other organs in Shawnee, KS? “Melanoma can grow extremely quickly and can become life-threatening in as little as six weeks,” noted Dr. Duncanson. “If left untreated, melanoma begins to spread, advancing its stage and worsening the prognosis.”